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Travels With Ernie

Adventures Off-the-Beaten-Path Across Sedona and Northern Arizona.

Follow Ernie to places that you didn't know existed, but would like to know more about.

Visitors enjoy amazing red rock formations along the Broken Arrow Trail in Sedona, Arizona.

Ernie Hikes the Sedona Broken Arrow Trail to Chicken Point and Beyond

The Broken Arrow Trail takes hikers on a winding path into a scenic valley surrounded by soaring red rock cliffs. The path gradually ascends to Chicken Point, a place with sweeping panoramic views and excellent photo opportunities. In the following account, Ernie reports on his hiking adventures along the Broken Arrow Trail.

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Tourists at the sunset overlook, Grand Canyon.

The Grand Canyon Trust: The Story That Most of Us Don’t Know

Every year, millions of tourists from around the globe converge on the Sedona area to enjoy the red rocks, the hiking and biking trails, the shopping and dining, and its many metaphysical experiences. The tourism business is the underpinning of Sedona’s vibrant and robust economy. It is not only critical to Sedona, but to the economy throughout Northern Arizona. Sedona serves as a hub for those venturing out to other points of interest around Northern Arizona.

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Kendrick Mountain

Kendrick Mountain

Kendrick Mountain is part of the San Francisco Peaks, a volcanic field north of Sedona, Arizona. Three maintained trails managed by the Kaibab National Forest, the Kendrick Mountain Trail, Pumpkin Trail, and Bull Basin Trail, lead hikers to the top of Kendrick Mountain and a fire lookout tower which is open during summer months.

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Montezuma Castle National Monument near Sedona, Arizona.

Montezuma Castle, A Major Attraction Near Sedona Arizona

One of the best preserved cliff dwellings in North America is Montezuma Castle, a five-story, 20-room cliff dwelling for prehistoric Sinagua Indians over 600 years ago. Early settlers to the area assumed it was associated with the Aztec emperor Montezuma, but the castle was abandoned almost a century before Montezuma was born.

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Tavasci Marsh, Spring-fed Riparian Zone Near Sedona, Arizona

Some views from atop the pueblo at Tuzigoot National Monument might make you wonder how on earth people chose this barren spot to live, and how they possibly scrapped out an existence here. But turn to the North and the East, and a whole different picture emerges. Tavasci Marsh, an ancient oxbow of the Verde River packs this section of valley with life, from cattails and cottonwoods to uncountable species of critters drawn to the plentiful food, water and shelter the marsh provides.

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Travels With Ernie — Ernie Spends the Holidays in Historic and Picturesque Williams, Arizona

I love Route 66! It is an iconic combination of fascinating history, dreamy nostalgia, exciting adventure, and incredible scenery. What more could an adventuresome dog ask for, let alone all of the peoples? But, dogs have a tremendous advantage over peoples, because we are low to the ground, and can really explore this place as no human can. And, Williams, Arizona is the ideal place to experience Route 66 during the holiday season.

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Ernie at the North Rim of the Grand Canyon, Arizona.

Sedona-Based Ernie Enjoys Camping at the North Rim of the Grand Canyon

Sedona, AZ Special Report:  Ernie Travels to the Grand Canyon North Rim from Sedona

September, 2015:  So I am making my first visit to the North Rim of the Grand Canyon, and am totally impressed by this place.  My peoples have parked their trailer in the National Park Service North Rim Campground, literally on the edge of the Rim.  This place is really cool. 

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Monument Valley

Monument Valley: A Landscape and A Culture

Quite possibly one of the most photographed spots on earth, Monument Valley is a striking testament to the impermanent nature of even the planet's most massive forms.

The isolated mesas and buttes that dramatically jut from the red desert floor are the last little stubs, relatively speaking, of the layers upon layer of rock that used to fill in all the space in between. It took hundreds of millions of years to lay down all those layers, and then 50 million or so to wear all but the remaining formations away to relatively nothing.

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