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Aerial Photos by Sedona Photographer, Ted Grussing

Follow Sedona photographer Ted Grussing on his amazing aerial photography excursions. Photos include magnificent views of Sedona and the Verde Valley, north to Flagstaff, Arizona and beyond. Scroll below to enjoy the slide show.

shadows

About today's photo, Ted Grussing writes: “The sun was warm and otherwise gray rocks glowed a warm and rich color. The mountain cast its shadow as far as the eye could see and clouds that were not blocked by the mountain picked up rich colors as well, volcanic cones in the shadow of the peaks. So it was on September 29th of 2016. The peak on the left is Humphrey’s Peak at 12,633 ft elevation and on the right, Agassiz Peak at 12,360 ft. Within the bowl on the right are the upper runs of Snow Bowl Ski Resort. On the left side in the clearing below the tree line you can see white debris, the remnants of a B-24 Bomber that slammed into the mountain on a night mission on September 15, 1944, killing all eight crew members.

See more of Ted's aerial photos (all photos copyright of Ted Grussing, all rights reserved). Click any image to fire up the slide show.

 

Ted Grussing, Sedona photographer and pilotABOUT PHOTOGRAPHER TED GRUSSING

Ted Grussing has been an attorney, photographer, business owner, custom gem cutter and jewelry designer, author, public speaker, soaring pilot and full time caregiver for his beautiful wife Corky who had MS for forty-seven years before she passed in November 2013. He developed a strong interest in photography at the age of nine and by age fourteen had his own darkroom and was engaged in professional photography. Photography has been a constant in Ted’s life ever since.

See Ted Grussing's amazing photography at TedGrussing.com.

and more at his personal website: www.tedandcorky.com

Also, those seeking inspiration by the beauty of the natural world will appreciate a free subscription to Ted's newsletter.

 

01 Mariah

 

 

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