Popular Sedona Articles

Enjoy our most popular articles about Sedona and Northern Arizona.

Take it easy in Winslow, Arizona, at the Standing On The Corner Park. Made up of a mural, bronze statue, and concrete corner alongside Route 66, the park is one of those quirky, quaint, and sometimes just outrageous, roadside attractions to be found throughout northern Arizona.
Maybe you've experienced the mystical nature of Sedona yourself. From the far-out to the apparently average, people of all stripes are deeply affected by Sedona's mysterious draw, known to many as "Red Rock Fever."
The dignified, hardy ponderosa pine has long been a symbol of the wild American West, and the tree has done particularly well for itself in Arizona. They're found throughout the West from Canada to Mexico, but the stand stretching from Flagstaff along the Mogollon rim to the White Mountains is reportedly the largest continuous stand on the continent.
Escape the summer heat in one of northern Arizona’s oldest and most spectacular swimming holes — Slide Rock on Oak Creek in Sedona.
It's not a castle... and Montezuma was never here!  Nestled into a limestone recess high above the flood plain of Beaver Creek in the Verde Valley stands one of the best preserved cliff dwellings in North America.
Tall, lofty, and shockingly pink, penstemons burst onto the nature scene during April in Sedona and the Verde Valley. Dazzling patches of them dancing in the sunlight and gentle breeze make it hard to keep your eyes on the road.
The open stretch of high desert between Flagstaff and Winslow may seem like the most uneventful place on earth, but 50,000 years ago, it was the site of an event of cosmic proportions.
Ravens are members of the crow family. They can be distinguished from your run-of-the-mill crow by their larger size, thick beaks, wedge shaped tail, and shaggy ruff of neck feathers.
Shout it out if you can name Arizona's State Mammal! Coyote? Good guess, but wrong. Mountain Lion? Fearsome, but no. Javalina? Mule Deer? Antelope? Antel-nope! Feel like you've run out of Arizona mammals? Shame on you! How can you forget Bassariscus astusus, the lithe little critter that 'round these parts we call the Ringtail Cat?
If you've seen a picture of Sedona, you've probably seen a picture of Cathedral Rock. We'll even go out on a limb and guess that you've seen a picture of Cathedral Rock from the vantage point of Red Rock Crossing, showing the incredible juxtaposition of red rock, mirror-like water, crayon-blue sky and soft sage greens that typifies the perfect Sedona scene.
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