Popular Sedona Articles

Enjoy our most popular articles about Sedona and Northern Arizona.

Now who doesn't love getting naked with strangers?  If you raised your hand, just click on by. If you were hoping, however, that I meant enjoying one of Northern Arizona's wilderness hot springs, read on my adventurous friend!
The New Age is not a religion. It is a time of spiritual enlightenment on the planet; a time of letting go of old ideas, suspicions, and controls.
If you've seen a picture of Sedona, you've probably seen a picture of Cathedral Rock. We'll even go out on a limb and guess that you've seen a picture of Cathedral Rock from the vantage point of Red Rock Crossing, showing the incredible juxtaposition of red rock, mirror-like water, crayon-blue sky and soft sage greens that typifies the perfect Sedona scene.
Just a few miles north up Interstate 17 from Montezuma Well is a hidden treasure of the ancient Sinagua past, surrounded by some of the loveliest creekside scenery around.
It's not a castle... and Montezuma was never here!  Nestled into a limestone recess high above the flood plain of Beaver Creek in the Verde Valley stands one of the best preserved cliff dwellings in North America.
Bobcats live all over the United States, yet regional lore and wisdom about the animals focus on how they seem uniquely and magically suited to a particular habitat, whether it’s the Louisiana bayou or the Grand Canyon.
While dramatic thunderstorms are the big stars of the monsoon, it's the seasonal shift in wind, from about mid-June to mid-September, that defines the phenomenon.
Visitors to Sedona are fortunate to experience red rock country during the summer monsoons. Some of the most enduring and classic images of Arizona are taken during the rainy season.
If you step out your front door one morning and it sounds like your front-yard prickly pear is talking to itself, no need to check yourself in. The chattering, muttering and burbling that emanates from beneath desert scrub all over the Southwest can usually be attributed to the Gambel's Quail, one of Arizona's favorite little desert friends.
Standing in the cool, dark confines of a room that was built 1,000 years ago kicks the imagination into high gear. Your common humanity with the people who slept, ate, argued and dreamed in this room surges to the surface of your consciousness, and time seems to simultaneously contract and expand.
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