Popular Sedona Articles

Enjoy our most popular articles about Sedona and Northern Arizona.

Maybe you've experienced the mystical nature of Sedona yourself. From the far-out to the apparently average, people of all stripes are deeply affected by Sedona's mysterious draw, known to many as "Red Rock Fever."
Ravens are members of the crow family. They can be distinguished from your run-of-the-mill crow by their larger size, thick beaks, wedge shaped tail, and shaggy ruff of neck feathers.
The dignified, hardy ponderosa pine has long been a symbol of the wild American West, and the tree has done particularly well for itself in Arizona. They're found throughout the West from Canada to Mexico, but the stand stretching from Flagstaff along the Mogollon rim to the White Mountains is reportedly the largest continuous stand on the continent.
Montezuma Well is a large sinkhole with a continuous flow of water seeping up through vents in the limestone. It was once home to Sinaguan farmers who used the water to irrigate their fields, and that today, supports aquatic life that cannot be found anywhere else in the world.
If you've seen a picture of Sedona, you've probably seen a picture of Cathedral Rock. We'll even go out on a limb and guess that you've seen a picture of Cathedral Rock from the vantage point of Red Rock Crossing, showing the incredible juxtaposition of red rock, mirror-like water, crayon-blue sky and soft sage greens that typifies the perfect Sedona scene.
Slide Rock is a portion of Oak Creek where the creekbed is a sloping chute of slippery rock, making it a natural waterslide. Along the way are little shallows for wading and deeper pools for a bona fide swim.
Like most desert animals, the black-tailed jackrabbit is specially designed to live in a harsh, hot landscape. Those long ears, which are practically translucent when the light hits them the right way, help him to detect the sounds of a potential predator.
"Wupatki" is the Hopi word for "Big House," the name given to the aforementioned structure as well as the entire preserve, but the people who lived here were pre-modern Hopi inhabitants. They were the Anasazi and Sinagua people, two groups who lived in the area from about 800 BC to the early 13th century AD.
Escape the summer heat in one of northern Arizona’s oldest and most spectacular swimming holes — Slide Rock on Oak Creek in Sedona.
Visitors to Sedona are fortunate to experience red rock country during the summer monsoons. Some of the most enduring and classic images of Arizona are taken during the rainy season.
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