Popular Sedona Articles

Enjoy our most popular articles about Sedona and Northern Arizona.

Even living in Arizona, the state with the second most hummingbird species in the U.S. (Texas has the most), you still feel lucky whenever you see a hummingbird.
Tall, lofty, and shockingly pink, penstemons burst onto the nature scene during April in Sedona and the Verde Valley. Dazzling patches of them dancing in the sunlight and gentle breeze make it hard to keep your eyes on the road.
Bobcats live all over the United States, yet regional lore and wisdom about the animals focus on how they seem uniquely and magically suited to a particular habitat, whether it’s the Louisiana bayou or the Grand Canyon.
Maybe you've experienced the mystical nature of Sedona yourself. From the far-out to the apparently average, people of all stripes are deeply affected by Sedona's mysterious draw, known to many as "Red Rock Fever."
"Wupatki" is the Hopi word for "Big House," the name given to the aforementioned structure as well as the entire preserve, but the people who lived here were pre-modern Hopi inhabitants. They were the Anasazi and Sinagua people, two groups who lived in the area from about 800 BC to the early 13th century AD.
Now who doesn't love getting naked with strangers?  If you raised your hand, just click on by. If you were hoping, however, that I meant enjoying one of Northern Arizona's wilderness hot springs, read on my adventurous friend!
Standing in the cool, dark confines of a room that was built 1,000 years ago kicks the imagination into high gear. Your common humanity with the people who slept, ate, argued and dreamed in this room surges to the surface of your consciousness, and time seems to simultaneously contract and expand.
While dramatic thunderstorms are the big stars of the monsoon, it's the seasonal shift in wind, from about mid-June to mid-September, that defines the phenomenon.
While the monolithic saguaro cactus, stretching its arms to the blue desert sky might well be the most popular emblem of the Sonoran desert, you won't see any saguaros around Sedona, at least not in the wild. Most of red rock country is too high in elevation for the saguaro, but not so for Arizona's other well-known cactus, the prickly pear.
Oak Creek Canyon, just outside Sedona, Arizona, is a spectacular and diverse riparian area and the state's second most popular canyon. Towering vermilion and cream walls rise out of a lush green canopy, creating an other-worldly beauty, with vistas in every direction.
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