Popular Sedona Articles

Enjoy our most popular articles about Sedona and Northern Arizona.

Even living in Arizona, the state with the second most hummingbird species in the U.S. (Texas has the most), you still feel lucky whenever you see a hummingbird.
The majestic red rock scenery and evergreen vegetation are two obvious reasons for the unique energy of Sedona and its tangible regenerative and inspirational effects. From a Brain Science perspective we know that the red-orange color of the rock is one of the most neuro-stimulating of colors. It enhances creative thinking and problem solving.
Oak Creek Canyon, just outside Sedona, Arizona, is a spectacular and diverse riparian area and the state's second most popular canyon. Towering vermilion and cream walls rise out of a lush green canopy, creating an other-worldly beauty, with vistas in every direction.
The New Age is not a religion. It is a time of spiritual enlightenment on the planet; a time of letting go of old ideas, suspicions, and controls.
Like no other part of the country, Native American culture and history play an immediately present and dynamic role in the life of northern and central Arizona. The landscape itself is imprinted with evidence of thousands of years of human life.
Quite possibly one of the most photographed spots on earth, Monument Valley is a striking testament to the impermanent nature of even the planet's most massive forms.
Visitors to Sedona are fortunate to experience red rock country during the summer monsoons. Some of the most enduring and classic images of Arizona are taken during the rainy season.
There is the old saying about the weather in Arizona - something to the effect that if the weather doesn't quite suit your taste, give it five minutes and it will change.  February is one of the more fickle months when it comes to the weather in red rock country, and while it may take a bit longer than five minutes for the forecast to shift, the variation in conditions can be dramatic.
Like most desert animals, the black-tailed jackrabbit is specially designed to live in a harsh, hot landscape. Those long ears, which are practically translucent when the light hits them the right way, help him to detect the sounds of a potential predator.
The open stretch of high desert between Flagstaff and Winslow may seem like the most uneventful place on earth, but 50,000 years ago, it was the site of an event of cosmic proportions.
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