Popular Sedona Articles

Enjoy our most popular articles about Sedona and Northern Arizona.

While dramatic thunderstorms are the big stars of the monsoon, it's the seasonal shift in wind, from about mid-June to mid-September, that defines the phenomenon.
The dignified, hardy ponderosa pine has long been a symbol of the wild American West, and the tree has done particularly well for itself in Arizona. They're found throughout the West from Canada to Mexico, but the stand stretching from Flagstaff along the Mogollon rim to the White Mountains is reportedly the largest continuous stand on the continent.
Birders in particular have come to know and love Tavasci Marsh for its unbelievable abundance of resident and migratory birds, many of which are representatives of fragile populations.
Montezuma Well is a large sinkhole with a continuous flow of water seeping up through vents in the limestone. It was once home to Sinaguan farmers who used the water to irrigate their fields, and that today, supports aquatic life that cannot be found anywhere else in the world.
It's not a castle... and Montezuma was never here!  Nestled into a limestone recess high above the flood plain of Beaver Creek in the Verde Valley stands one of the best preserved cliff dwellings in North America.
Like most desert animals, the black-tailed jackrabbit is specially designed to live in a harsh, hot landscape. Those long ears, which are practically translucent when the light hits them the right way, help him to detect the sounds of a potential predator.
While names of the red rocks are descriptive to varying degrees, there’s no doubt in your mind when you see Bell Rock which one you’re looking at. It sits just to the North of Hwy 179, between the Village of Oak Creek and Sedona, a giant Hershey’s Kiss plopped down right next to the highway.
If you've seen a picture of Sedona, you've probably seen a picture of Cathedral Rock. We'll even go out on a limb and guess that you've seen a picture of Cathedral Rock from the vantage point of Red Rock Crossing, showing the incredible juxtaposition of red rock, mirror-like water, crayon-blue sky and soft sage greens that typifies the perfect Sedona scene.
Lake Powell presents a stark, striking landscape born of tension among the elements, including the influence of man. Water and land are in a perpetual standoff, the lake's shores lapping away at a waterline it took 17 years to reach, once the dam was complete.
Tall, lofty, and shockingly pink, penstemons burst onto the nature scene during April in Sedona and the Verde Valley. Dazzling patches of them dancing in the sunlight and gentle breeze make it hard to keep your eyes on the road.
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