Popular Sedona Articles

Enjoy our most popular articles about Sedona and Northern Arizona.

If you've seen a picture of Sedona, you've probably seen a picture of Cathedral Rock. We'll even go out on a limb and guess that you've seen a picture of Cathedral Rock from the vantage point of Red Rock Crossing, showing the incredible juxtaposition of red rock, mirror-like water, crayon-blue sky and soft sage greens that typifies the perfect Sedona scene.
If you step out your front door one morning and it sounds like your front-yard prickly pear is talking to itself, no need to check yourself in. The chattering, muttering and burbling that emanates from beneath desert scrub all over the Southwest can usually be attributed to the Gambel's Quail, one of Arizona's favorite little desert friends.
Lake Powell presents a stark, striking landscape born of tension among the elements, including the influence of man. Water and land are in a perpetual standoff, the lake's shores lapping away at a waterline it took 17 years to reach, once the dam was complete.
While the monolithic saguaro cactus, stretching its arms to the blue desert sky might well be the most popular emblem of the Sonoran desert, you won't see any saguaros around Sedona, at least not in the wild. Most of red rock country is too high in elevation for the saguaro, but not so for Arizona's other well-known cactus, the prickly pear.
Quite possibly one of the most photographed spots on earth, Monument Valley is a striking testament to the impermanent nature of even the planet's most massive forms.
Bobcats live all over the United States, yet regional lore and wisdom about the animals focus on how they seem uniquely and magically suited to a particular habitat, whether it’s the Louisiana bayou or the Grand Canyon.
More than half a century after its construction, the Chapel of the Holy Cross continues to be a place of wonder, spiritual renewal, and sublime vistas for all who come to Sedona.
Just a few miles north up Interstate 17 from Montezuma Well is a hidden treasure of the ancient Sinagua past, surrounded by some of the loveliest creekside scenery around.
Ravens are members of the crow family. They can be distinguished from your run-of-the-mill crow by their larger size, thick beaks, wedge shaped tail, and shaggy ruff of neck feathers.
"Wupatki" is the Hopi word for "Big House," the name given to the aforementioned structure as well as the entire preserve, but the people who lived here were pre-modern Hopi inhabitants. They were the Anasazi and Sinagua people, two groups who lived in the area from about 800 BC to the early 13th century AD.
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