Popular Sedona Articles

Enjoy our most popular articles about Sedona and Northern Arizona.

Shout it out if you can name Arizona's State Mammal! Coyote? Good guess, but wrong. Mountain Lion? Fearsome, but no. Javalina? Mule Deer? Antelope? Antel-nope! Feel like you've run out of Arizona mammals? Shame on you! How can you forget Bassariscus astusus, the lithe little critter that 'round these parts we call the Ringtail Cat?
Like most desert animals, the black-tailed jackrabbit is specially designed to live in a harsh, hot landscape. Those long ears, which are practically translucent when the light hits them the right way, help him to detect the sounds of a potential predator.
Like no other part of the country, Native American culture and history play an immediately present and dynamic role in the life of northern and central Arizona. The landscape itself is imprinted with evidence of thousands of years of human life.
The dignified, hardy ponderosa pine has long been a symbol of the wild American West, and the tree has done particularly well for itself in Arizona. They're found throughout the West from Canada to Mexico, but the stand stretching from Flagstaff along the Mogollon rim to the White Mountains is reportedly the largest continuous stand on the continent.
The New Age is not a religion. It is a time of spiritual enlightenment on the planet; a time of letting go of old ideas, suspicions, and controls.
Even living in Arizona, the state with the second most hummingbird species in the U.S. (Texas has the most), you still feel lucky whenever you see a hummingbird.
Montezuma Well is a large sinkhole with a continuous flow of water seeping up through vents in the limestone. It was once home to Sinaguan farmers who used the water to irrigate their fields, and that today, supports aquatic life that cannot be found anywhere else in the world.
The Grand Canyon may well be the most accessible of the world's wonders.  At the place in the park where the main lodges are, a carload of people can practically park right at the edge of the South Rim, which is bordered by a wide paved path with excellent interpretive materials and amazing viewpoints along the way.
Summer rainstorms of the Arizona desert cue sexually mature male tarantulas to begin their single-minded quest to find females, marching stoically along to fulfill their romantic destinies.
They're hairy, stinky, and downright adorable! Meet the Javelina, Sedona's famous pig-like desert dweller. Otherwise known as the Collared Peccary, the Javelina is one of three species of New World peccaries. They look like small, very hairy pigs, with bulky bodies perched on short legs with dainty three-toed hooves.
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