Popular Sedona Articles

Enjoy our most popular articles about Sedona and Northern Arizona.

While the monolithic saguaro cactus, stretching its arms to the blue desert sky might well be the most popular emblem of the Sonoran desert, you won't see any saguaros around Sedona, at least not in the wild. Most of red rock country is too high in elevation for the saguaro, but not so for Arizona's other well-known cactus, the prickly pear.
Just a few miles north up Interstate 17 from Montezuma Well is a hidden treasure of the ancient Sinagua past, surrounded by some of the loveliest creekside scenery around.
Even living in Arizona, the state with the second most hummingbird species in the U.S. (Texas has the most), you still feel lucky whenever you see a hummingbird.
Quite possibly one of the most photographed spots on earth, Monument Valley is a striking testament to the impermanent nature of even the planet's most massive forms.
They're goofy, rangy, amusing but seemingly harmless. Oh, but don't be fooled. Forget the dopey purple "Beep Beep!" critter made famous by the Warner Brothers cartoons.
The Grand Canyon may well be the most accessible of the world's wonders.  At the place in the park where the main lodges are, a carload of people can practically park right at the edge of the South Rim, which is bordered by a wide paved path with excellent interpretive materials and amazing viewpoints along the way.
Like no other part of the country, Native American culture and history play an immediately present and dynamic role in the life of northern and central Arizona. The landscape itself is imprinted with evidence of thousands of years of human life.
It's not a castle... and Montezuma was never here!  Nestled into a limestone recess high above the flood plain of Beaver Creek in the Verde Valley stands one of the best preserved cliff dwellings in North America.
The dignified, hardy ponderosa pine has long been a symbol of the wild American West, and the tree has done particularly well for itself in Arizona. They're found throughout the West from Canada to Mexico, but the stand stretching from Flagstaff along the Mogollon rim to the White Mountains is reportedly the largest continuous stand on the continent.
Montezuma Well is a large sinkhole with a continuous flow of water seeping up through vents in the limestone. It was once home to Sinaguan farmers who used the water to irrigate their fields, and that today, supports aquatic life that cannot be found anywhere else in the world.
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