Popular Sedona Articles

Enjoy our most popular articles about Sedona and Northern Arizona.

They're hairy, stinky, and downright adorable! Meet the Javelina, Sedona's famous pig-like desert dweller. Otherwise known as the Collared Peccary, the Javelina is one of three species of New World peccaries. They look like small, very hairy pigs, with bulky bodies perched on short legs with dainty three-toed hooves.
While names of the red rocks are descriptive to varying degrees, there’s no doubt in your mind when you see Bell Rock which one you’re looking at. It sits just to the North of Hwy 179, between the Village of Oak Creek and Sedona, a giant Hershey’s Kiss plopped down right next to the highway.
While dramatic thunderstorms are the big stars of the monsoon, it's the seasonal shift in wind, from about mid-June to mid-September, that defines the phenomenon.
It's not a castle... and Montezuma was never here!  Nestled into a limestone recess high above the flood plain of Beaver Creek in the Verde Valley stands one of the best preserved cliff dwellings in North America.
Oak Creek Canyon, just outside Sedona, Arizona, is a spectacular and diverse riparian area and the state's second most popular canyon. Towering vermilion and cream walls rise out of a lush green canopy, creating an other-worldly beauty, with vistas in every direction.
Like no other part of the country, Native American culture and history play an immediately present and dynamic role in the life of northern and central Arizona. The landscape itself is imprinted with evidence of thousands of years of human life.
Only two hours from Sedona is the majestic Grand Canyon, one of the seven natural wonders of the world and the most visited national park in North America.
Maybe you've experienced the mystical nature of Sedona yourself. From the far-out to the apparently average, people of all stripes are deeply affected by Sedona's mysterious draw, known to many as "Red Rock Fever."
The panel of petroglyphs is hidden from view, a large juniper obscuring the boulder located just before a narrow one-lane bridge that crosses Red Tank Draw.
Bobcats live all over the United States, yet regional lore and wisdom about the animals focus on how they seem uniquely and magically suited to a particular habitat, whether it’s the Louisiana bayou or the Grand Canyon.
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