Popular Sedona Articles

Enjoy our most popular articles about Sedona and Northern Arizona.

Birders in particular have come to know and love Tavasci Marsh for its unbelievable abundance of resident and migratory birds, many of which are representatives of fragile populations.
Tall, lofty, and shockingly pink, penstemons burst onto the nature scene during April in Sedona and the Verde Valley. Dazzling patches of them dancing in the sunlight and gentle breeze make it hard to keep your eyes on the road.
Lake Powell presents a stark, striking landscape born of tension among the elements, including the influence of man. Water and land are in a perpetual standoff, the lake's shores lapping away at a waterline it took 17 years to reach, once the dam was complete.
The panel of petroglyphs is hidden from view, a large juniper obscuring the boulder located just before a narrow one-lane bridge that crosses Red Tank Draw.
Maybe you've experienced the mystical nature of Sedona yourself. From the far-out to the apparently average, people of all stripes are deeply affected by Sedona's mysterious draw, known to many as "Red Rock Fever."
Spring in Arizona is the season residents and visitors alike wait for in eager anticipation. The desert terrain bursts into a canvas of unimaginable beauty as delicate desert wildflowers blanket the landscape.
Is the Sedona vortex real?  To help answer that question, we looked at some examples of a vortex and thought about why Sedona has long been considered a special place. See maps of the Sedona vortex locations too.
If you step out your front door one morning and it sounds like your front-yard prickly pear is talking to itself, no need to check yourself in. The chattering, muttering and burbling that emanates from beneath desert scrub all over the Southwest can usually be attributed to the Gambel's Quail, one of Arizona's favorite little desert friends.
More than half a century after its construction, the Chapel of the Holy Cross continues to be a place of wonder, spiritual renewal, and sublime vistas for all who come to Sedona.
It's not a castle... and Montezuma was never here!  Nestled into a limestone recess high above the flood plain of Beaver Creek in the Verde Valley stands one of the best preserved cliff dwellings in North America.
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