Popular Sedona Articles

Enjoy our most popular articles about Sedona and Northern Arizona.

They're hairy, stinky, and downright adorable! Meet the Javelina, Sedona's famous pig-like desert dweller. Otherwise known as the Collared Peccary, the Javelina is one of three species of New World peccaries. They look like small, very hairy pigs, with bulky bodies perched on short legs with dainty three-toed hooves.
If you step out your front door one morning and it sounds like your front-yard prickly pear is talking to itself, no need to check yourself in. The chattering, muttering and burbling that emanates from beneath desert scrub all over the Southwest can usually be attributed to the Gambel's Quail, one of Arizona's favorite little desert friends.
Tall, lofty, and shockingly pink, penstemons burst onto the nature scene during April in Sedona and the Verde Valley. Dazzling patches of them dancing in the sunlight and gentle breeze make it hard to keep your eyes on the road.
"Wupatki" is the Hopi word for "Big House," the name given to the aforementioned structure as well as the entire preserve, but the people who lived here were pre-modern Hopi inhabitants. They were the Anasazi and Sinagua people, two groups who lived in the area from about 800 BC to the early 13th century AD.
Even living in Arizona, the state with the second most hummingbird species in the U.S. (Texas has the most), you still feel lucky whenever you see a hummingbird.
The Grand Canyon may well be the most accessible of the world's wonders.  At the place in the park where the main lodges are, a carload of people can practically park right at the edge of the South Rim, which is bordered by a wide paved path with excellent interpretive materials and amazing viewpoints along the way.
Escape the summer heat in one of northern Arizona’s oldest and most spectacular swimming holes — Slide Rock on Oak Creek in Sedona.
Shout it out if you can name Arizona's State Mammal! Coyote? Good guess, but wrong. Mountain Lion? Fearsome, but no. Javalina? Mule Deer? Antelope? Antel-nope! Feel like you've run out of Arizona mammals? Shame on you! How can you forget Bassariscus astusus, the lithe little critter that 'round these parts we call the Ringtail Cat?
Spring in Arizona is the season residents and visitors alike wait for in eager anticipation. The desert terrain bursts into a canvas of unimaginable beauty as delicate desert wildflowers blanket the landscape.
Birders in particular have come to know and love Tavasci Marsh for its unbelievable abundance of resident and migratory birds, many of which are representatives of fragile populations.
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